Petřín (327 m) is a hill in the center of Prague, Czech Republic. It rises some 130 m above the left bank of the Vltava River. The hill, almost entirely covered with parks, is a favorite recreational area for the inhabitants of Prague. The hill is featured prominently in Franz Kafka’s early short story “Description of a Struggle” and briefly in Milan Kundera’s novel The Unbearable Lightness of Being.The chronicler Cosmas describes Petřín as a very rocky place, the hill is allegedly called Petřín because of the large number of rocks. Since ancient times there was digged stones, from which Prague has built a lot of buildings. Medieval defence wall, the Hunger Wall was built on Petřín Hill during 1360 – 1362, by the order of Czech King Charles IV. The Petřín Lookout Tower, which strongly resembles the Eiffel Tower, was built atop a hill in 1891. Other sights include the Rose Garden, Mirror Maze, St Lawrence Cathedral and St Michael Church.

Lookout Tower

The Petřín Lookout Tower is a 63.5-metre-tall steel-framework tower in Prague, which strongly resembles the Eiffel Tower. The Petřínská rozhledna was built in 1891 and was used as an observation tower as well as a transmission tower. Today the Petřínská rozhledna is a major tourist attraction. The hill is roughly a half-hour walk up paths (which gets quite slippery in the snow) and the tower is a shorter but fairly tiring climb; however, the hill is served by a frequent funicular and the tower has an elevator for disabled people. In 2014 the tower was visited by more than 557,000 visitors, with foreigners accounting for over 70% of said visitors.

The two observation platforms are accessible via 299 stairs in sections of 13 per flight running around the inside of the structure.

There are a gift shop and a small cafeteria on the main level. On the lowest level is a small exhibition area. One exhibition displayed Merkur Observation Towers and was held from 6 March 2013 to 30 March 2014.

The views from Lookout Tower aren’t bad